IELTS-speaking-preparation

IELTS speaking preparation necessitates taking every opportunity to speak in English. While you won’t be expected to speak in detail on specialist topics you will be asked questions on general, everyday things. In your day to day life take notice of the topics that come up in your own language and ask yourself if you could talk about them in English.
Notice what’s going on around you and try to describe what’s happening in English. How do you feel about things? Why is life like it is?
We would recommend you read IELTS’ public version of the speaking band descriptors. Whilst these are not identical to the descriptors used by the examiners they are sufficiently similar to allow you to get a very good idea of how your interview is marked. Understanding them will help you consider your abilities and shortcomings and help with your IELTS speaking preparation.
The speaking interview has three sections. Knowing what they are will help you prepare.

IELTS-speaking-preparation

IELTS-speaking-preparation

Section 1
In the first section you will be asked questions about yourself. Make sure you are able to talk about yourself, your family, your job, where you live and your interests and hobbies. Practise extending answers. If you are asked “Do you like…?” answer “yes, because…”, not just “Yes.” Likewise with “How do you…?”, answer with more than a short one or two word phrase.
Being able to explain how you feel about something or express an opinion is also very useful in this section.

Section 2
This is often called the ‘Long Turn’. You are given a topic to talk on for 1 – 2 minutes. You need to be able to plan your talk quickly; you will have just 1 minute for this which is not very long.
First make up your own topics based on things that interest you. That way you will not have difficulty thinking of things to say and will be able to practise talking for 1 – 2 minutes so that you get a good feel for how long that is. Once you are confident you are able to speak for at least one minute, practise ending your speech in case you can’t manage 2 minutes. This could be something like “That’s all I can say about…” or even a simple “Thank you”, if you can’t find a more appropriate way of finishing off. You need to make it clear to the examiner that you have finished. Don’t try to speak for the full 2 minutes if you have no more to say. As long as you have spoken for at least a minute that’s fine and finishing your talk appropriately will make you more coherent.
Once you have practised using topics you are interested in, find more sample topics or make up your own. Practise allowing yourself one minute to make notes and then time your speaking. It is a good idea to record yourself so that you can check your fluency and coherence. Practise until you can talk fluently for two minutes without repeating yourself and without much hesitation.
Section 3
Although this section is described as a discussion, in practise the interviewer will be asking the questions, not the candidate. However, it will be more like a conversation because the questions the interviewer asks may vary according to your response to a previous question.
The best way to practise would be to spend time in conversation, perhaps with a fellow student or friend. Select a particular topic area and talk about it. Stick to a particular topic for around 5 minutes before taking a break or moving on to another topic.

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